In Which I’m Seen Ravin’ About Another Stiefvater Novel

First “The Scorpio Races”, then “The Raven Boys”, now its sequel… I think it may be time I just go ahead and call myself this author’s fan.

The Book: “The Dream Thieves (The Raven Cycle, #2)” by Maggie Stiefvater.

Genre: Paranormal YA.

Blurb (as set down on the front flap of the book’s jacket): If you could steal things from your dreams, what would you take?

Ronan Lynch has secrets. Some he keeps from others. Some he keeps from himself.

One secret: Ronan can bring things out of his dreams.

And sometimes he’s not the only one who wants those things.

Ronan is one of the raven boys – a group of friends, practically brothers, searching for a dead king named Glendower, who they think is hidden somewhere in the hills by their elite private school, Aglionby Academy. The path to Glendower has long lived as an undercurrent beneath town. But now, like Ronan’s secrets, it is beginning to rise to the surface – changing everything in its wake.

Of The Raven Boys, Entertainment Weekly wrote, “Maggie Stiefvater’s can’t-put-it-down paranormal adventure will leave you clamoring for book two.” Now the second book is here, with the same wild imagination, dark romance, and heart-stopping twists that only Maggie Stiefvater can conjure.

My Thoughts: The short version: I want the third book a week ago, please.

The long version: Apart from the characters (which I broke down for ya back in my review of book one), my favorite thing about this book was the way the author says things. She uses language in vivid, unexpected, and often startlingly humorous ways I don’t frequently see and would rarely (if ever) think up on my own. Some small percentage of the time, her choices of phrasing and/or analogy may not quite work for me, but on the whole, I ate it up. Rather than just try to describe it, though, let me give you a taste of what I mean.

The three brothers were nothing if not handsome copies of their father… Declan had the same way of taking a room and shaking its hand. Matthew’s curls were netted with Niall’s charm and humor. And Ronan was everything that was left: molten eyes and a smile made for war.

A smile made for war… So much did that line please me when first I read it, I had to write it down by hand. Had I done so with more snippets from the book, this blog post would be largely ready to go, right now. But I didn’t, and I’m not the sort who easily memorizes what I read, so I’ll have to flip through the pages at random to pull out more quotes for you. Let’s see what grabs me next…

The first week of June, Gansey found a headless statue of a bird with king carved on its belly in Welsh. The second week, they wired a refrigerator in the upstairs bathroom, right next to the toilet. The third week, someone killed Niall Lynch. The fourth week, Ronan moved in.

That’s another trait. That matter-of-factness, never mind what an extraordinary thing has just been said. She makes everyday things poetry, and incredible things bluntly simplistic. There’s beauty in the balance.

“So what you’re saying is you can’t explain it.”

“I did explain it.”

“No, you used nouns and verbs together in a pleasing but illogical format.”

That’s what it’s like, sometimes. Not altogether logical, or logical in a way you can’t quite grasp, but somehow pleasing nonetheless.

I could search through for more examples, but my dislike for skimming would have me reading the whole book all over again – which I will someday happily do, but I am kind of trying to do other things, at the moment.

HSYRT? (Hey, Should You Read This?): If you’re looking for votes, you’ve got a “yes” from me. I don’t even think it’s wholly necessary for you to have read book one first (enough months had passed between my reading of each that I’d largely forgotten the details from the series opener), though obviously I liked that book, too, so there’s another “yes” vote for you; I’m just saying, it can work on its own.

My personal copies of “Dream Thieves” and “Raven Boys”.

My personal copies of “Dream Thieves” and “Raven Boys”.

Such are my thoughts on “The Dream Thieves. If you’ve got any of your own, I’d be pleased to read ‘em in the comments!

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “In Which I’m Seen Ravin’ About Another Stiefvater Novel

  1. I suggest The Speckled People by Hugo Hamilton…an amazing example of Island life.I was not a fan of the book. I read it last month. I thought the story was too drawn out. I couldn’t visualize Thisby and the occasional rude humor wasn’t appreciated. Overall I liked reading about your take on the book. I didn’t like TSR.

    • Most stories feel a little drawn out to me, because my storytelling instinct is to get to the point. And I didn’t have any more trouble visualizing anything than usual, since…well, I always have trouble visualizing things! In any case, sorry you didn’t enjoy your reading experience with “The Scorpio Races”. Just goes to further illustrate that one reader’s “wow, love this book!” is another person’s “meh, not so much”.

  2. Oh my God, I really, really want to marry this entire book series. Or adopt it. Do you want to adopt them as kids or something, I’ve heard single parenthood can be a bit exhausting, so I need a partner-in-crime.
    I may have started tearing up just thinking about how these books make me feel when I read them. Sigh. Loved your review. It’s so hard to put into words how magical this series is.

    • Right?? I mean, maybe Maggie Stiefvater could put it into words, because look at her words, but I’m just over here like, “Read it, loved it, MORE NOW.”
      As for adopting a book series… *a glance around the crowd in my head* Whaddaya think, gang? Room for a few more?…and their world?

    • Nay, I’ve not read her “Shiver” books. The first works I knew of her were “Lament” and “Ballad” (because how could I resist a book titled “Ballad”?); they were okay, I thought, but didn’t grab me the way “Scorpio Races” and “Raven Cycle” have. So it could well be that you’ll enjoy her other works more.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s